A year of provenance

The MA in Academic Practice prompts questions about the sustainability of screen printing onto both fabric and paper. As an experiment in mapping provenance and natural dye sources I designed and printed a booklet. Actually two; nitty-natty folding travel-happy ways of showing the colours.

Shapes inspired by the dye gardens, market stalls, and community spaces that plants were collected from; a stylised plan of dye provenance. Indigo from Wales, chalky-seams of madder from Hitchin, mulberries from Shepherds Bush, and bio-waste pomegranate skin from Peru, (thanks Brixton market).

Screen-printed cut-paper stencil designs made from recycled newsprint.

The distillation of colour is starch-thick with cornflour. Overlapping, casually haphazard, but oh so carefully manipulated print designs. Softest weld-yellow, creeping towards soda ash modifier, creating a blasting of gold. Several days of printing in the sunlit Ceres studio.

On cotton Khadi paper, textured watercolour Bockingford, and favourite Somerset satin.

Booklet 1. Sixteen segmented plant studies, folded into a finger-twirling library of colour acquaintances.

With an accompanying interlocking interpretation of the dyes drawn onto the trace paper.

Booklet 2. Pages of delight to be folded with attention to position and juxtaposition, and interspersed with dye notes on trace-paper.

Natural dye print paste for paper; made in the kitchen.

Gather materials that are in your locality. Try to use bio-waste and left over kitchen ingredients, or items that are foraged sustainably. Some of my favourite natural dye ingredients are; onion skins, red cabbage offcuts, turmeric peelings, carrot tops, buddleia, nettles, coffee grinds, and avocado pips.

Soak dried or tough materials overnight. Grind roots and berries. Chop plants into small pieces.

Simmer the prepared materials gently in a stainless steel container with a small amount of water for about half an hour. Leave dye material to cool down. Squeeze through a plastic sieve and/or using a clean tea towel or muslin.Collect the dye liquor. The used plant material can be put onto a compost heap.

The dye liquor can be thickened with common household starch. I like to use cornflour; 8g flour to 100ml dye liquor.